Traveling the World on a Third World Passport - What is it like and how to overcome it

Traveling the World on a Third World Passport

What is it like and how to overcome it

30 Comments /

There are many things in life that we can choose to be but one thing we can't choose is where we are born. The location of our birth can determine the opportunity we will get, the privilege we will receive, and it can predefine how our lives will play out. I truly believe that traveling the world is a rite of passage every human being in this world should take, but unfortunately, the access to this privilege is predetermined by which country we are born in and the passport we were given.

I have been traveling the world since 2012 and every time I mentioned to the first-world passport holders, the things I have to go through in order to go to a place like Europe, they were shocked.

I am a Thai citizen through and through and my Thai passport is ranked 54 on the Passport Index with 39 countries visa-free, 41 visa-on-arrival and 116 countries visa required. In comparison to European passports which ranked 2 - 10 on the Passport Index with over 119 visa-free, 36 visa-on-arrival and only 43 countries visa required, you can see the difference.

Every time I hear first-world passport holders complain about doing a visa run or having to apply for an electronic visa online, I cringe a little. For us third-world passport holders, we have to go through much worst to get to places they can simply hop on a plane and be there in no time. How much worst? Well, let me explain the things we have to go through just to get to Europe.

What is it like?

Europe does not make it easy for us to travel to their continent, in contrary to them coming to us. The entire process takes at least 2 weeks to a month from us calling to book for a time slot which can be fully booked up to 2 weeks, to us picking the passport up which can be 3 days to a month from the day we apply.

Planning a Trip

Planning for a trip for people with a first world passport can simply be just buying a plane ticket and show up on time, but for us, it requires extensive planning weeks in advance.

For Europe, first we would have to find the embassy to apply, read up their document requirements and followed the list to a tee. Documents involved are usually a valid return flight ticket, all the accommodation booking details for the entire stay, an itinerary of the entire trip, a 3 months bank statement with cash movement (to prove that it is your money), a letter from work proving that you have something to return to, non-refundable fee from 50 - 200 USD and many more. If anything is missing from the documents, we would get rejected outright and we would have to make an appointment again.

As you can see, going somewhere with a third world passport requires extensive research and careful planning that hinder us from exploring the world as freely as other types of passport.

Traveling on a Whim

People often wonder why we, third-world passport holders, don't travel on a whim. The answer is simple, we can't. Our passport just doesn't allow the type of backpacking trip that goes on for months and months around the world without a return ticket. Even with countries that are visa-free to us, we sometimes get rejected if we do not have a return or onward ticket.

Depending on the countries we are going, we are also forced to be bound to our home country because some visa applications require us to be in our home country to be able to apply. For example, I can not go traveling in Turkey for a few months and apply for a European visa in Istanbul to continue my journey to Europe. I have to come back to Thailand to get the visa and fly back to Europe which doubled the cost for us, and since we are not from a very rich country, we can only afford to do this so many time.

What do we get?

For most first-world passport holders, when you get a visa or exempted from one, you are often given a maximum fixed period of time you can stay in a country, say 90 days in Europe, or Thailand together with multi-entries. For us, on the other hand, is not as simple.

With a third-world passport, often times, the duration we get is considerably less than our first-world counterpart. Europe is the worst at this because they will only give us the duration and the entry that is shown on our submitted itinerary. If we apply for a Schengen visa with a 10 days itinerary involving countries in the Schengen zone, instead of getting the 90 days maximum period like other passport holders, they would only give us 11 days single entry visa, which leave us no room for flexibility.

Imagine if we want to backpack through Europe for 3 months, we would have to book 90 days of accommodation, printed them all out and submitted to the embassy every time. Even with that, we wouldn't be able to go out of the Schengen zone, say for a small spontaneous trip to Croatia and get back into the Schengen area, because that will be considered multi-entry.

As you can see, it is not all flowers and sunshine even after we got the visa.

How I Travel the World With a Third World Passport

Even though that sounds grim, I can confidently say that it is not impossible for us to travel the world like a first-world passport holder if we know our way around our passport weaknesses. There are many world travelers out there with a third world passport (Aileen from IAmAileen.com, Melai from LovedandWanderlust.com) that are constantly pushing the limit of what is possible for us.

Research and Preparation

It all comes down to doing your homework before a trip. First I would see which countries have my passport exempted and I would try to stick to that area first and if I came across a country that requires me to get a visa prior to the trip, then I would go into their website and look at the visa application requirement one by one.

The key is to do enough research that you have an itinerary you can base your trip on. You don't have to follow the itinerary to a tee but it is good to know which country you can go and cannot go without a visa in order to prevent disappointment.

For example, when I first planned my trip to the middle east, I wanted to go to Egypt, Jordan, and Turkey for 3 months. I found out early on that I would need a visa for Egypt prior to traveling and none needed for the other 2 so I went and got my Egypt visa beforehand. I was also looking at neighboring countries like Georgia and Armenia in case I have spare time which I did and I was prepared for it.

As you can see, you can travel the world with a third world passport with the flexibility like a first world passport if you do enough research.

Paperwork for Visa

After you have done your homework, it's time to do the boring part, the paperwork. The key here is to prove to the embassy that you have the mean to come back to your home country. They put this rule in the first place to prevent us from going to their countries and work illegally and we will have to prove that that is not the case.

More often than not, the embassy will require you to provide several documents about your itineraries such as flights, accommodation, and day-to-day itinerary. Here is a list of things you are often asked to prepare:

  • Filled-in Application Form
  • A Copy of Passport
  • 2 x photos with specific requirements
  • A confirmed return flight ticket
  • Proof of booked accommodation
  • Travel Health Insurance
  • A day-to-day itinerary
  • 3 months bank statement
  • Proof of employment or a letter explaning what you do and how you earn money

The application form is often found on the embassy website where you can fill in online, print it out and attach with a copy of your passport, 2 photos and all the other documents listed above.

I often book a flight in advanced that would give me enough time for the visa process (a month prior) and often time I'd buy at full price so that I could get a full refund if need be. Be sure to look at the airline's refund policy so that you can choose the right type of ticket.

For a day-to-day itinerary, I would often come up with a plan that I would stick to loosely and write them in the format shown below:

[Arrival Date] – [Departure Date]: Travel to [City], [Country] via [Bus or Train or Airline] and [a brief activity]

Here is an example of the itinerary I wrote for my Europe trip:

Jan 22, 2018: Flight from Bangkok to Warsaw, Poland via Qatar Airline

Jan 22, 2018 – Feb 12, 2018: Warsaw, Poland and travel around the city..

For the accommodation, I often go on Booking.com to book the accommodation for the entire time I planned to be traveling based on the day-to-day itinerary I came up with, printed the email confirmation, and make sure that the date on the booking confirmation emails add up to the exact amount of time I want to be there for. Booking.com is great for this because they allow you to cancel the booking for free if need be.

For the travel insurance, I often buy mine from World Nomads which has all the tools I need to get the right travel insurance for the right country I am going to and covers the entire time I would be there for.

For the proof of employment, you can ask your employer to provide an employment letter with your job title, the date you started and a signature of an authorized personnel in your company. If you are like me who do not have an employer, you will have to write your own letter explaining in detail what you do, who is your client, and how much money you are making per month. If you have any business website to show, capture a screenshot and print them out too. The good thing is once you have written one freelance letter for an application, you can reuse that forever.

Last but not least, the bank statement. This is by far one of the most important documents you will have to carefully prepare. One of the criteria they used to approve or reject people is the amount of money you have. You must have enough money in your bank account to cover the entire trip and the bank statement will have to show an active bank account with money coming in and out regularly in the last 3 months which is to prevent people from asking others to temporary transfer the money to the account just for the visa process.

From my experience, if you have around 2,000 USD in your account for a 3 months trip in Europe, that should be enough to prove that you can cover all the cost but the value varies considerably depending on your duration, the embassy you are applying to and how expensive that country is, so prepare accordingly.

Apply Process

The process of applying for a visa varies depending on the embassy but for the most part, you will have to make an appointment with the embassy in your home country, prepare all your documents according to their requirements on their website, and organized them in the order they recommended.

If there is no embassy in your home country, then you can apply it in any country that has it.

Once all the documents are ready, you will have to go to the embassy at the time slot you were assigned to and give them all your documents. They may ask you a few questions about your trip, so answer them truthfully and the process should go smoothly. They will usually tell you when you will get the result so all you have to do now is wait until they call you and they will tell you when you can come and pick up the result. You won't know the result until you pick it up so don't bother asking the person who called you.

Getting Rejected

Getting rejected is a common occurrence for us. I was lucky enough to only got rejected once, but many people often do and all we can do is observe what went wrong and try again. There are many factors that could affect the outcome of a visa process and more often than not, it boils down to either we did not give enough proof of our return or the bank statement did not pass their requirements.

The key is to never give up and keep trying. You just need to know what the embassy is looking for in your application and try to prepare enough documents to reinforce it. When it comes to applying for a visa, it is always better to be over prepared than under prepared.

I hope this guide helps shed light on how lucky it is to be a first-world passport holder, the situation us, third-world passport holders have to deal with and how we can overcome the limits of our passport and travel the world freely. If you have any question, please do not hesitate to ask me in the comments below.

Looking for more inspirational articles? Check out The Solo Traveler’s Inspiration section where we will discuss topics related to the nomadic and traveling lifestyle and shower-thoughts that will invoke wanderlust in all of us.

The Solo Traveler’s Resources is a series of posts by Bucketlistly where we will explore the ways of life of nomads including how we work, travel, and what we carry in our backpack.

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30 Comments


Thank you Pete this is really great but always sorry to hear about the situation. I hope one days these broken laws will be fixed but until then please don’t let it be the thing that deters you from exploring.


Thank you Pete this is really great but always sorry to hear about the situation. I hope one days these broken laws will be fixed but until then please don’t let it be the thing that deters you from exploring.

Hey Dan,

Thanks to your question a few months back that sparked an inspiration in me to write this article for those who don't know and for those who want to travel the world with what they have :) It's a shame but with enough patience, it is mostly possible :)


This is one of the best travel posts I read, and gives a great perspective for us "First world" passport holders. Bravo!

I have 2 passports (Swedish and US) and been traveling full time for almost 5 years now. However, I soon plan to do a lot of traveling with my Vietnamese girlfriend so your post was also timely.

Thanks a lot!
Andy


This is one of the best travel posts I read, and gives a great perspective for us "First world" passport holders. Bravo!

I have 2 passports (Swedish and US) and been traveling full time for almost 5 years now. However, I soon plan to do a lot of traveling with my Vietnamese girlfriend so your post was also timely.

Thanks a lot!
Andy

Thank you for the comment, Andy! Glad you like the article! Indeed, it is not very well-known to first-world passport holders what we have to go through so I hope this clears things up and also answer the question why we do not travel on a whim like our most backpackers. It is not as easy :)

I wish you the best of luck traveling with your girlfriend! Send her the article when it is time for her to apply for a visa. I'm sure the guide will help her somewhere along the line :D

Best,

Pete R.


I own a Cuban passport, and I can say for sure that it is tough to travel with these "weaks" papers :(


sajad

You have no idea how much is hard to travel with Iranian passport. it's even harder than yours.
but like you said the world is still beautiful.


nihil

Cannot agree more with you on this...sometimes it drives you nuts to figure out the process do the associated paperwork. Its high time countries regard tourists from the third world just like any other tourists instead of associating the baggage of "illegal immigration" every time and subjecting one's application to mindless scrutiny. I do remember that getting the "employer approval" was one such pre-requisite for the schengen. So if you're a self-employed wanderlust from the third world...you will have an even tougher time. But then the desire to see the world has to be stronger to sail through this


I own a Cuban passport, and I can say for sure that it is tough to travel with these "weaks" papers :(

I can totally feel you. Cuban passport is even worst than what I have. I wish there is a better way for us to travel the world without having to go through this every time we want to go somewhere. :/


You have no idea how much is hard to travel with Iranian passport. it's even harder than yours.
but like you said the world is still beautiful.

Of course not. I'm merely reflecting on my experience and I've talk to one Iranian in Yazd and she said it is not easy, culturally with parents/bf and the paperwork that requires it. At least I think you can go to turkey independently right? I met an Iranian couple in Van a long time ago traveling there.


Cannot agree more with you on this...sometimes it drives you nuts to figure out the process do the associated paperwork. Its high time countries regard tourists from the third world just like any other tourists instead of associating the baggage of "illegal immigration" every time and subjecting one's application to mindless scrutiny. I do remember that getting the "employer approval" was one such pre-requisite for the schengen. So if you're a self-employed wanderlust from the third world...you will have an even tougher time. But then the desire to see the world has to be stronger to sail through this

Yes, I completely agree. There should be more research in making it easier for travelers to travel no matter where they are from and filter out people that plans to work and overstay. After all, travelers like us bring in profit, not take them out.

TBH I have no idea how it can improve for the better especially with what's happening around the world these days.


sajad replying to Pete Rojwongsuriya
Of course not. I'm merely reflecting on my experience and I've talk to one Iranian in Yazd and she said it is not easy, culturally with parents/bf and the paperwork that requires it. At least I think you can go to turkey independently right? I met an Iranian couple in Van a long time ago traveling there.

Turkey it's easy for us. except women, they should have permission from father/husband to get passport.


Romain

I have so much respect for your resilience, thank you for reminding me how lucky I am for having such a privilege and putting a spotlight on the ones who don't have it so easy. I hope things will change and get easier for everyone to travel in this world in better conditions, you're definitely raising awareness, keep travelling and inspiring the world.


Tron Thongsringklee

I do share your pain man. I'm currently holding Thai passport but living the UK.
Crossing borders around here still needs those hard works.

Great post by the way.
Thanks for sharing this.


Turkey it's easy for us. except women, they should have permission from father/husband to get passport.

Yes, I talked to her and was completely surprised that they would need an approval. I found young Iranians very rebellious towards the government in terms of freedom and I think that's a good sign that they are still trying to have their voices heard. :)

I only wish bad politics didn't affect the people but it did. :/


I have so much respect for your resilience, thank you for reminding me how lucky I am for having such a privilege and putting a spotlight on the ones who don't have it so easy. I hope things will change and get easier for everyone to travel in this world in better conditions, you're definitely raising awareness, keep travelling and inspiring the world.

Thank you for reading and the comments! :) I really hope it improves, or at least get the conversation going and raising awareness about it. :)


I do share your pain man. I'm currently holding Thai passport but living the UK.
Crossing borders around here still needs those hard works.

Great post by the way.
Thanks for sharing this.

Thank you for the comments, Tron. Brexit does not seem to help much I presume. :/ Well if you stay there long enough without leaving the country you might get a UK citizenship. I think you have to be there for at least 8 years, and not traveling out of the UK too often. Dual passport would be the best option for you here.


I've often sort of wondered about this, because getting visas for me as a Canadian, while expensive and a pain in the ass, I don't have to do it very often. Some are granted multi entry without even asking, like China & Brazil, so that's great. But I imagine your experience is like me applying for my Russian visa, which cost a bunch of money, was really restrictive and a huge pain in the ass.

I feel bad for all the normal people like the OP that the barriers to entry are such, but even he knows and said why. I may take my country for granted, but ever since I started travelling, I've never taken my passport for granted, both physically or mentally.

I arrived in Ljubljana and a bunch of us entered the EU line because the signs weren't really lit up, so we got told to join the other line. 2 guys on Palestinian passports needed to join the line with me so I just let them go ahead of me and said "you guys get a raw deal as is, go ahead man". In my ignorance to world politics I guess, I wasn't even really sure that Palestinians has their own passports, maybe I never thought of it, maybe I thought they travelled on Israeli passports, but even just based on the the amount of papers they needed right away I looked at my hand that had just my phone and passport and thought "glad I'm not carrying their passport".


Completely agree with you! I'm originally from Venezuela and became Irish Citizen last year. Now I'm free to travel around the world, it is such a complete different experience with both passports. Currently I'm waiting for the visa of my venezuelan wife so she can join me here in Ireland, processing times are between 6-12 months.. Marriage doesn't give her automatic right for her to join me, Venezuelans are visa required to enter Ireland. We are just hoping the visa is approved quickly, as it is not easy to live so far from my wife..


sajad replying to Pete Rojwongsuriya
Yes, I talked to her and was completely surprised that they would need an approval. I found young Iranians very rebellious towards the government in terms of freedom and I think that's a good sign that they are still trying to have their voices heard. :)

I only wish bad politics didn't affect the people but it did. :/

I should disagree with you at this part.
I see new generation really interesting, they are fighting against mandatory, they are not in religion anymore.
I love their sprit.

but old generation was affected by politics.

generally I'm sanguine about all these changes.


I've often sort of wondered about this, because getting visas for me as a Canadian, while expensive and a pain in the ass, I don't have to do it very often. Some are granted multi entry without even asking, like China & Brazil, so that's great. But I imagine your experience is like me applying for my Russian visa, which cost a bunch of money, was really restrictive and a huge pain in the ass.

I feel bad for all the normal people like the OP that the barriers to entry are such, but even he knows and said why. I may take my country for granted, but ever since I started travelling, I've never taken my passport for granted, both physically or mentally.

I arrived in Ljubljana and a bunch of us entered the EU line because the signs weren't really lit up, so we got told to join the other line. 2 guys on Palestinian passports needed to join the line with me so I just let them go ahead of me and said "you guys get a raw deal as is, go ahead man". In my ignorance to world politics I guess, I wasn't even really sure that Palestinians has their own passports, maybe I never thought of it, maybe I thought they travelled on Israeli passports, but even just based on the the amount of papers they needed right away I looked at my hand that had just my phone and passport and thought "glad I'm not carrying their passport".

Hey Brett,

Thank you for reading and sharing your experience. Yes, I believe it is similar to you guys going to Russia whereas, for us Thais, we do not need a visa for Russia. :) It can be tough for us, even tougher for African passports and Palestinians as you mentioned, but I hope this article will help someone in the same shoe overcome such limitations, and be inspired to travel more despite the barrier. :)


Completely agree with you! I'm originally from Venezuela and became Irish Citizen last year. Now I'm free to travel around the world, it is such a complete different experience with both passports. Currently I'm waiting for the visa of my venezuelan wife so she can join me here in Ireland, processing times are between 6-12 months.. Marriage doesn't give her automatic right for her to join me, Venezuelans are visa required to enter Ireland. We are just hoping the visa is approved quickly, as it is not easy to live so far from my wife..

Hey Luis,

Thank you for sharing your experience! I hope your wife get the visa on time soon! I only wish I have another passport to see what it feels like to travel without stress haha :)


Wow what an ordeal. A Thai buddy once said that in Thailand, if a project is really hard “Hey at least it’s not as tough as going to America.”

I am a US passport holder and didnt realize till a few years ago just how lucky I am.

It’s a wonder all the hassle never drove you to burn your passport. If I were a 3rd world passport holder, I might. I’d be like “to hell with intl travel!” Unfortunately illegal immigration is very real and alive.

One thing to consider is checking for developing countries bordering first world nations. For example, Mexicans living in border towns such as Tijuana, have a slightly easier time getting tourist visas to US than ppl further inland. They still must show all the docs, but it’s easier to convince the US consulate that a Tijuana -> San Diego trip really is just a visit.

Point is becoming legally resident in a developing border town would be easier than becoming such in the first world country.


Wow what an ordeal. A Thai buddy once said that in Thailand, if a project is really hard “Hey at least it’s not as tough as going to America.”

I am a US passport holder and didnt realize till a few years ago just how lucky I am.

It’s a wonder all the hassle never drove you to burn your passport. If I were a 3rd world passport holder, I might. I’d be like “to hell with intl travel!” Unfortunately illegal immigration is very real and alive.

One thing to consider is checking for developing countries bordering first world nations. For example, Mexicans living in border towns such as Tijuana, have a slightly easier time getting tourist visas to US than ppl further inland. They still must show all the docs, but it’s easier to convince the US consulate that a Tijuana -> San Diego trip really is just a visit.

Point is becoming legally resident in a developing border town would be easier than becoming such in the first world country.

Thank you, John! Haha, that is quite true in a sense. It's like going to a job interview for us getting the US visa.

It did prevent me from taking the first step to travel the world sooner but after I got used to it, it's pretty much something I know I need to do more than others and eventually accept it haha.

That's a good observation John, you are right. It means that you have a home to go back to and it's not hard to get back unlike immigrants who are miles away from home. Something to think about for me. :D


John replying to Pete Rojwongsuriya
Thank you, John! Haha, that is quite true in a sense. It's like going to a job interview for us getting the US visa.

It did prevent me from taking the first step to travel the world sooner but after I got used to it, it's pretty much something I know I need to do more than others and eventually accept it haha.

That's a good observation John, you are right. It means that you have a home to go back to and it's not hard to get back unlike immigrants who are miles away from home. Something to think about for me. :D

What 1st world country are u trying to visit?


Camotee

I’m a third world passport holder and what this article doesn’t mention is how much you have to spend per visa application. 120 to 200 USD plus whatever you spend getting the documents ready. Banks often charge you per copy of bank statement. Then there’s no refund if you get denied. And no not every embassy is required to give you a reason why you’ve been denied. Just a heads up to those who meet travelers from a third world country: they’re journey started way before they even arrived at your shores.


I’m a third world passport holder and what this article doesn’t mention is how much you have to spend per visa application. 120 to 200 USD plus whatever you spend getting the documents ready. Banks often charge you per copy of bank statement. Then there’s no refund if you get denied. And no not every embassy is required to give you a reason why you’ve been denied. Just a heads up to those who meet travelers from a third world country: they’re journey started way before they even arrived at your shores.

Hey Camotee,

Yes, I feel your pain. I did mention the non-refundable price for the visa under Planning a Trip section and from my experience, I never got told the reason why I got rejected or heard anyone got direct answers from the embassy so yes, I think it is a common practice.

Plus the people working at the embassy are not the most welcoming people which are ironic to me because they are the first people we will meet before our trip and that is not the kind of the first impression you would like of a country. :)


This is one of the best travel posts I read, and gives a great perspective for us "First world" passport holders. Bravo!

I have 2 passports (Swedish and US) and been traveling full time for almost 5 years now. However, I soon plan to do a lot of traveling with my Vietnamese girlfriend so your post was also timely.

Thanks a lot!
Andy

Dear Pete,

Thanks a bunch for this article. I would love to share my thoughts with you.

The thing is that I am European (just geographically, not EU-citizen), but still my Ukrainian passport is pretty weak and the willingness to travel too strong to resist. When I was 15 I made a journey to France, where I met 13 years old German boy. He asked me which countries I have been to and which of them I liked. I named more than 8 countries (for many Ukrainians by the time I have seen a lot and many people were jealous for me exploring the world) of Europe (it's easier to get the visa since it's Schengen). His reaction was shooking to 15 years old me, who was so proud of having more travels than any of my friends and family. He said: "Europe is boring and you haven't seen a lot. The countries you went to are European. I prefer the US, Australia or Africa". I knew that explaining to "spoiled" (sorry for this word) 13 tears old boy who was born with this possibility to travel without big challenge to get a visa, it would be time-wasting.

Now I'm 23 and I still have this story in my mind. Sure, I met more this kind of people in my life, but also I see how important is to explain to them that we just literally can't travel more or as free as they can. By the way, I still have seen just Europe, but of course, I dream about different countries. It's just not that easy...

Thanks for writing this article. It makes me feel that starting writing my own blog could be useful as well and I don't have to be scared to share my opinion. Hopefully one day the world will be open for us without criteria 'how strong your passport is'.

Happy to share this post on my FB to explain my "first world" passport holders friends how hard is to travel for some people.

Best,
vladyslavna


Dear Pete,

Thanks a bunch for this article. I would love to share my thoughts with you.

The thing is that I am European (just geographically, not EU-citizen), but still my Ukrainian passport is pretty weak and the willingness to travel too strong to resist. When I was 15 I made a journey to France, where I met 13 years old German boy. He asked me which countries I have been to and which of them I liked. I named more than 8 countries (for many Ukrainians by the time I have seen a lot and many people were jealous for me exploring the world) of Europe (it's easier to get the visa since it's Schengen). His reaction was shooking to 15 years old me, who was so proud of having more travels than any of my friends and family. He said: "Europe is boring and you haven't seen a lot. The countries you went to are European. I prefer the US, Australia or Africa". I knew that explaining to "spoiled" (sorry for this word) 13 tears old boy who was born with this possibility to travel without big challenge to get a visa, it would be time-wasting.

Now I'm 23 and I still have this story in my mind. Sure, I met more this kind of people in my life, but also I see how important is to explain to them that we just literally can't travel more or as free as they can. By the way, I still have seen just Europe, but of course, I dream about different countries. It's just not that easy...

Thanks for writing this article. It makes me feel that starting writing my own blog could be useful as well and I don't have to be scared to share my opinion. Hopefully one day the world will be open for us without criteria 'how strong your passport is'.

Happy to share this post on my FB to explain my "first world" passport holders friends how hard is to travel for some people.

Best,
vladyslavna

Hi, Vladyslava

Thank you for your story! I know how it feels to be on that end. It sure seems like the world is not fair and it probably isn't but as you mentioned, if your will is strong, you will soon be everywhere in the world. :)

I had the same thought before I started traveling and then 6 years passed, I've been around and I gotta say, it does get easier. :) You will get used to the situation of getting a visa etc. and sooner or later you will learn the trick and be everywhere.

Don't worry, your opinion written from a third-world passport holder will be useful to Ukrainians and other Balkan countries that are in Europe but are not part of Schengen. They are probably in the same boat as us and if you write your Europe travel stories from your perspective, people will surely resonate with it. :)

Good luck with your blog and thank you for the share!


Good article,
I can totally feel you. Cuban passport is even worst than what I have. I wish there is a better way for us to travel the world without having to go through this every time we want to go somewhere. :/


Tessa

Try being Zimbabwean, passport rank 66:-( I've always said that any country worth visiting (including ones on my own continent ironically) require me to get a visa and it is always such a stressful and painful process. Many countries don't even have embassies in Zimbabwe so that makes it even harder! What sucks is that my grandmother was born in the UK and my ancestors can be traced in the UK all the way back to William the Conqueror but because my parents were born in Zimbabwe I am not entitled to a British passport! How ridiculous is that?!


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